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WA Bird Watering Stations

In Jirdarup bushland precinct - WA

  • YEAR: 2020
  • STATE: Western Australia
  • FOCUS AREAS: Saving Species/SDG 15: Life on Land

The bird waterers in Jirdarup Bushland are specifically designed to aid the survival of local native birdlife, particularly the endangered Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos and vulnerable Forest Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos that roost and feed in the area. The structures are popular with all manner of bird species large and small and provide them with clean water all year round.

FNPW support

This project was funded through generous donations from FNPW supporters across Australia and beyond.

Grant round: 2020 Community Conservation Grants

Project overview

 The bird waterers in Jirdarup Bushland are specifically designed to aid the survival of local native birdlife, particularly the endangered Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos and vulnerable Forest Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos that roost and feed in the area. The structures are popular with all manner of bird species large and small and provide them with clean water all year round.

 Activities for threatened species or ecological communities include:

  •  monitoring and ongoing management of species
  •  novel habitat building e.g. nest boxes
  •  translocations or other movement of species

The launch event on 19 September 2020 featured a Nyoongar welcome and smoking ceremony, a keynote speech by Aboriginal artist Daryl Bellotti (who designed signage for the Bushland), and a guided walk by Nyoongar elder Neville Collard. The Mayor of Victoria Park, Karen Vernon, spoke about the value of Jirdarup Bushland and its relevance to the wider cultural heritage of the community. The Friends of Jirdarup Bushland will continue to consult with the Town’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee and other local Elders to provide guided walks, interpretation, signage and community education.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

FNPW supports projects across Australia. In the spirit of reconciliation the we acknowledge the Traditional Owners of Country and recognise their continuing connection to land, waters and culture.

PROGRESS OF THIS PROJECT

The project was completed in 2021.

This project was funded by FNPW in 2020.

PROJECT PARTNERS

Friends of Jirdarup Bushland is the lead organisation for this project.

Further information about our project partner can be found on their website:

www.friendsofjirdarupbushland.org.au

Project gallery

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