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QLD Seagrass Dispersal

  • YEAR: 2013
  • STATE: Queensland
  • FOCUS AREAS: Healing our Land/Saving Species/SDG 14 : Life below water

Thanks to your support, research is underway into the link between endangered Green Sea Turtles, vulnerable Dugongs, and seagrass, to increase survival rates for all. Floods and cyclones wiped out 98% of the seagrass meadows between Cairns and Townsville (over 400 km!) in 2010-11, which saw a more than double increase in annual dugong and sea turtle deaths in 2011-12. Now research is underway to determine how far and effectively these marine mega-herbivores can disperse seagrass, so meadows at risk of the longest natural recovery times can be prioritised for restoration. This will mean better survival rates for dugongs and turtles.

FNPW support

This project was funded through generous donations from FNPW supporters across Australia and beyond.

Project overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

FNPW supports projects across Australia. In the spirit of reconciliation the we acknowledge the Traditional Owners of Country and recognise their continuing connection to land, waters and culture.

PROGRESS OF THIS PROJECT

The project was completed in XXXX / is ongoing / due for completion in XXXX.

This project was funded by FNPW in XXXX.

PROJECT PARTNERS

James Cook University is the lead organisation for this project.

Further information about our project partner can be found on their website:

www.jcu.edu.au

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